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Showing posts tagged with #criminal

Episode 76: The Big Lick

The Tennessee Walking Horse has a natural gait that's famously smooth. And, if trained in a certain way, it can perform a walk that's even more spectacular. But, there's a secret behind how, exactly, these horses are trained to do the crowd-pleasing step they're celebrated for. Mary Helen Montgomery brings us the story. 

 

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Episode 75: The Gatekeeper

"I keep saying 'where's the body? Kill someone,'" Marilyn Stasio told us. She reads at least 200 crime novels a year to determine which are worthy of her prestigious "Crime Column" in the New York Times Book Review. We talk with her about crime as entertainment - and why people are so addicted to the genre that she can't stay away from: "My fingers just itch when I see something that's says 'murder.'"

 

You can find more of Marilyn Stasio's thoughts on crime fiction in her column.

 

We want to know what your favorite crime novel is. It can be new or old. Write to us on Twitter @criminalshow, Facebook @ThisIsCriminal, or email us at hello@thisiscriminal.com.

 

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Artwork by Julienne Alexander.  

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Episode 74: Catastrophe

In 1993, more than 1,000 levees broke along the Mississippi River, flooding thousands of acres. In most cases the floods were seen as an “Act of God.” In one case, however, the flood was a crime: “knowingly causing a catastrophe.” This story comes to us from Noam Osband

For more information, check out Adam Pitluk's book, Damned to Eternity

Criminal is a proud member of Radiotopia from PRX.

If you haven't already, please review us on iTunes! It's an important way to help new listeners discover the show: iTunes.com/CriminalShow.

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If you'd like to introduce friends or family members to podcasts, we created a How to Listen guide based on frequently asked questions.

Artwork by Julienne Alexander.  

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Episode 73: Carry A. Nation

At the turn of the century, Carry Nation was “America’s foremost lady hellraiser” and "the apostle of reform violence.” In her own words, she was "a bulldog running along at the feet of Jesus, barking at what He doesn't like." 

 
We liked her hatchet pins so much, we thought we'd try to make some of our own. They say "CRIMINAL" on the handle. Get yours here
 
Thanks to everyone at the Kansas State Historical Society, and to Maya Goldberg-Safir. 
 

 

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If you'd like to introduce friends or family members to podcasts, we created a How to Listen guide based on frequently asked questions.


Artwork by Julienne Alexander.  

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Episode 72: Bears, Birds, and Bones
As long as 2,500 years ago, Native Americans placed the bones of the dead in giant mounds of earth in the shape of animals. The Effigy Mounds National Monument was created to protect the mounds - and the bones inside. But in 2011, a new superintendent discovered that the remains of 41 Native Americans had disappeared.
 

In this episode, we use the term "Native American" because the story refers to legislation that uses that term. The National Park Service now uses “American Indian”.


This episode contains language that may not be suitable for everyone.
 

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If you haven't already, please review us on iTunes! It's an important way to help new listeners discover the show: iTunes.com/CriminalShow.


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If you'd like to introduce friends or family members to podcasts, we created a
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Julienne Alexander.  

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Episode 71: A Bump in the Night

Amber Dawn was 20 when she moved into a one-bedroom apartment in Enumclaw, Washington. On her very first night, she began to notice strange sounds. And they didn't stop. 

 

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Artwork by Julienne Alexander.  

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Episode 70: The Procedure

In 1967, a very unlikely group of individuals gathered to help women quietly break the law and obtain an abortion. The first step was to call a phone number. A recording of a woman's voice would tell you what do to next.

 

Criminal is a proud member of Radiotopia from PRX.

 

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If you'd like to introduce friends or family members to podcasts, we created a How to Listen guide based on frequently asked questions.

 

Artwork by Julienne Alexander.  



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Episode 69: Becoming Chief Brown

Shortly after David Brown was sworn in as the Dallas Chief of Police, his son shot and killed a police officer. Just before he retired as chief, 5 Dallas officers were shot and killed in what was said to be the deadliest attack for law enforcement since September 11th, 2001. Today on the show, we ask David Brown how he's changed after 33 years of policing.

 

Criminal is a proud member of Radiotopia from PRX.

 

If you haven't already, please review us on iTunes! It's an important way to help new listeners discover the show: iTunes.com/CriminalShow.

 

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If you'd like to introduce friends or family members to podcasts, we created a How to Listen guide based on frequently asked questions.

 

Artwork by Julienne Alexander.  

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Episode 68: All the Time in the World

The “body farm" at Texas State University is a place almost no one except researchers and law enforcement are able to see, because it's one of very few places in the world that deliberately puts out human bodies to decompose in nature. Forensic Anthropologists observe decomposition in order to help law enforcement discern when and how someone may have died. We asked if we could visit, and they agreed.

 

Criminal is a proud member of Radiotopia from PRX.

 

If you haven't already, please review us on iTunes! It's an important way to help new listeners discover the show: iTunes.com/CriminalShow.

 

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If you'd like to introduce friends or family members to podcasts, we created a How to Listen guide based on frequently asked questions.

 

Artwork by Julienne Alexander.  

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Episode 67: Milk Carton Kids

On a Sunday morning in 1982, in Des Moines, Iowa, Johnny Gosch left his house to begin his usual paper route. A short time later, his parents were awakened by a phone call – it was a neighbor — their paper hadn't come. His would be the first face of a missing child ever printed on a milk carton. This story comes to us from reporter Annie Brown and our friends at 99% Invisible. We're on the road reporting new stories this week, and will be back on June 2nd with a brand new Criminal episode.

 

Criminal is a proud member of Radiotopia from PRX.

 

If you haven't already, please review us on iTunes! It's an important way to help new listeners discover the show: iTunes.com/CriminalShow.

 

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If you'd like to introduce friends or family members to podcasts, we created a How to Listen guide based on frequently asked questions.

 

Artwork by Julienne Alexander.  

 

 
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Episode 66: Bully

Skidmore, Missouri is a very small town. In the '70s, there was only one bar, one grocery store, and one bully. Ken McElroy was so ruthless and intimidating that even law enforcement looked the other way. He terrorized the town for decades, until they finally fought back. 

 

We spoke with Harry MacLean, author of In Broad Daylight.

 

Criminal is a proud member of Radiotopia from PRX.

 

If you haven't already, please review us on iTunes! It's an important way to help new listeners discover the show: iTunes.com/CriminalShow.

 

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If you'd like to introduce friends or family members to podcasts, we created a How to Listen guide based on frequently asked questions.

 

Special thanks to Chelsea Korynta.

Artwork by Julienne Alexander.  

 

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Episode 65: The Kingfish

In 1928, Huey P. Long became the youngest Governor in Louisiana’s history. He bragged that he bought lawmakers like “sacks of potatoes, shuffled ‘em like a deck of cards.” By the time he was 39 years old, he’d made his way to the U.S. Senate. And just a couple of weeks after his 42nd birthday, he was dead. Buried 16 feet deep on the front lawn of the state Capitol, with no autopsy. 

 

Criminal is a proud member of Radiotopia from PRX.

 

If you haven't already, please review us on iTunes! It's an important way to help new listeners discover the show: iTunes.com/CriminalShow.

 

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If you'd like to introduce friends or family members to podcasts, we created a How to Listen guide based on frequently asked questions.

 

Artwork by Julienne Alexander.  

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Episode 64: 420

The Colorado Department of Transportation says the 420 mile markers on the state's highways were stolen so often, they had to replace them with 419.99 mile markers. Many people know that "420" represents marijuana - hence the popularity of the mile markers - but very few know why. It's not a police code, it's not the number of chemical compounds in cannabis, and it's certainly not Bob Marley's birthday. Today on the show, we try for the real story.

 

Criminal is a proud member of Radiotopia from PRX.

 

If you haven't already, please review us on iTunes! It's an important way to help new listeners discover the show: iTunes.com/CriminalShow.

 

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If you'd like to introduce friends or family members to podcasts, we created a How to Listen guide based on frequently asked questions.

 

Artwork by Julienne Alexander.  

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Episode 64: 420

The Colorado Department of Transportation says the 420 mile markers on the state's highways were stolen so often, they had to replace them with 419.99 mile markers. Many people know that "420" represents marijuana - hence the popularity of the mile markers - but very few know why. It's not a police code, it's not the number of chemical compounds in cannabis, and it's certainly not Bob Marley's birthday. Today on the show, we try for the real story.

 

Criminal is a proud member of Radiotopia from PRX.

 

If you haven't already, please review us on iTunes! It's an important way to help new listeners discover the show: iTunes.com/CriminalShow.

 

Say hello on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. Sign up for The Accomplice.

 

If you'd like to introduce friends or family members to podcasts, we created a How to Listen guide based on frequently asked questions.

 

Artwork by Julienne Alexander.  

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Episode 63: Rochester, 1991

Kim Dadou says she wishes she had a nickel for every person who has asked why she didn't leave her abusive boyfriend. They stayed together for four years. And then, in the middle of the night on December 17th, 1991, Kim's entire life changed. 

This episode contains descriptions of physical violence against women. It may not be suitable for everyone. Please use discretion.

 

Criminal is a proud member of Radiotopia from PRX.

 

If you haven't already, please review us on iTunes! It's an important way to help new listeners discover the show: iTunes.com/CriminalShow.

 

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If you'd like to introduce friends or family members to podcasts, we created a How to Listen guide based on frequently asked questions.

 

Artwork by Julienne Alexander.  

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Episode 62: Wildin

In 2014, 16-year-old Wildin Acosta left Olancho, Honduras and traveled toward the U.S. border. When he arrived, he turned himself in to border patrol agents. He was one of 68,541 unaccompanied minors who crossed the border into the U.S. that year.

 

Criminal is a proud member of Radiotopia from PRX.

 

If you haven't already, please review us on iTunes! It's an important way to help new listeners discover the show: iTunes.com/CriminalShow.

 

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If you'd like to introduce friends or family members to podcasts, we created a How to Listen guide based on frequently asked questions.

 

Artwork by Julienne Alexander.  

 

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Episode 61: Vanish

People have faked death to escape criminal convictions, debts, and their spouses. In 2007, a man named Amir Vehabovic faked his death just to see who showed up at the funeral (answer: only his mom). It's an appealing soap-opera fantasy, but actually disappearing requires an incredible amount of planning. How do you obtain a death certificate, a believable new identity, or enough money to start a new life? Today -- the answers to those questions, stories of fake death gone wrong, and a man who spends his life bringing back the dead.


 

 
 
Steven Rambam's Investigative Agency, Pallorium, Inc.
 
 
Criminal is a proud member of Radiotopia from PRX.
 

If you haven't already, please review us on iTunes! It's an important way to help new listeners discover the show: iTunes.com/CriminalShow.


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If you'd like to introduce friends or family members to podcasts, we created a How to Listen guide based on frequently asked questions.


Artwork by Julienne Alexander.  
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Episode 60: Finding Sarah and Philip

In 2005, Teri Knight drove 650 miles on midwestern roads through Ohio, Indiana, Iowa and Illinois, pleading with the public to help her do what law enforcement and the FBI had not been able to: find the remains of her children Sarah and Philip Gehring. An Ohio woman read about Teri Knight's search in her local paper, and decided she would try to help.

 

Criminal is a proud member of Radiotopia from PRX.

If you haven't already, please review us on iTunes! It's an important way to help new listeners discover the show: iTunes.com/CriminalShow.

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If you'd like to introduce friends or family members to podcasts, we created a How to Listen guide based on frequently asked questions.


Artwork by Julienne Alexander.  

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Episode 59: In Plain Sight

In 1849, abolitionist and attorney Wendell Phillips wrote: "We should look in vain through the most trying times of our revolutionary history for an incident of courage and noble daring to equal that of the escape of William and Ellen Craft; and future historians and poets would tell this story as one of the most thrilling in the nation's annals, and millions would read it, with admiration of the hero and heroine of the story." Unfortunately, almost 170 years later, William and Ellen Craft aren't well known anymore. Today, we have the story of this couple's incredible escape. 

 

Read the Craft's book: Running a Thousand Miles for Freedom
Running http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/585

Barbara McCaskill wrote about William and Ellen Craft in Love, Liberation, and Escaping SlaveryWilliam and Ellen Craft in Cultural Memory
http://www.ugapress.org/index.php/books/love_liberation_escaping_slavery

 

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If you'd like to introduce friends or family members to podcasts, we created a How to Listen guide based on frequently asked questions.


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Episode 58: Walnut Grove
In 2010, Michael McIntosh's son was incarcerated at the Walnut Grove Youth Correctional Facility in the small town of Walnut Grove, Mississippi. One Sunday, McIntosh went to visit his son and was turned away because, he was told, prison officials "did not know" where his son was. He spent the next six weeks searching for his son, only to find him in the hospital with severe injuries. And McIntosh's son wasn't the only one who had been hurt at the facility. Walnut Grove was such a violent prison that one Federal Judge called it "a cesspool of unconstitutional and inhuman acts." Today, we have the story of an especially troubled youth prison, the for-profit corporations that managed it, and the small town that relied on it. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Criminal is a proud member of Radiotopia from PRX.

If you haven't already, please review us on iTunes! It's an important way to help new listeners discover the show: iTunes.com/CriminalShow.

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If you'd like to introduce friends or family members to podcasts, we created a How to Listen guide based on frequently asked questions.

Artwork by Julienne Alexander.  

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