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Showing posts tagged with #article

"I Just Wish for People to Give Me a Chance"

Omar Khadr was 15 when he was captured in Afghanistan in 2002. He was held in Guantanamo for years without charges. He was tortured. And earlier this month, after nearly 13 years behind bars, he was released on bail.

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How Do You Define A Gang Member?

If you’re in a gang, the law can impose harsh penalties. But even though the police think they’ve got all the signs of gang membership down pat, it turns out that you can’t really tell just by looking.

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For the Mouth Speaks

After a member of the Church of Wells abruptly left the group (which may or may not be a cult), many held out hope. A week later she went back, and the church’s elders are eager to explain why.

Previously: Sinners in the Hands

Sonia Smith | Texas Monthly | May 2015
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17 Shots in Pasco

The life of Antonio Zambrano-Montes, shot dead by the police in Washington state.

Brooke Jarvis | Seattle Met | May 2015
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What Was Wrong With Everything Was People

On being kicked out of Doris Lessing’s house.

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Why You Can Kiss My Mulatto Ass

“The recent reemergence of mulatto identity isn’t about race, it’s about actively acknowledging a multiethnic reality in a simplistically racialized world.”

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Why Baltimore Blew Up

It wasn’t just the killing of Freddie Gray. Inside the complex legal infrastructure that encourages — and covers up — police violence.

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Training Young Doctors: The Current Crisis

In the 1890s, Sir William Osler, now regarded as something of a demigod in American medicine, created at the Johns Hopkins Hospital a novel system for training physicians after graduation from medical school. It required young physicians to reside in the hospital full-time without pay, sometimes for years, to learn how to care for patients under the close supervision of senior physicians.

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The Quest for Hitler's Lost Treasures

The detective work that led to the recovery of a trove of stolen Nazi art.

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Why Baltimore Blew Up

The failures of the “broken windows” approach to policing.

Matt Taibbi | Rolling Stone | May 2015
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Surfing Into Adolescence

To be thirteen, with a surfboard, in Hawaii.

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Mattress Day

The travails of mattress salesmen on one of the busiest weekends of the year.

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The Experiment That Changed Superheroes Forever

It was a compendium of stories that saved the company that launched it, revolutionized the comics medium, and became the foundation of the multi-billion-dollar Marvel cinematic empire.

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Training Young Doctors

On the failing institution of the teaching hospital.

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Unclimable

Searching for the line between courage and humility on an expedition to Cirque of the Unclimbables, a remote ring of perfect rock-climbing mountains in Canada.

Eva Holland | SB Nation | May 2015
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Ninety-Nine Bottles Of Pee On The Wall

Everyone says they’ve got a book inside, but hundreds of people actually write them — and are preyed upon by scam artists. The greatest story of literary vigilantism ever told.

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  • THIS IS AMAZING. : amiantos
  • I wish I could like this post more than just once. : amiantos
Off Diamond Head

Growing up among the tall waves and schoolyard bullies of Hawaii.

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Our Backup Planet

What’s behind the dream of colonizing Mars?

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Monkey Day Care

The subject of a child research experiment tries to get to the bottom of what happened to her.

Michelle Dean | The Verge | May 2015
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A City of Two Tales

The Cleveland police are still adamant that they did nothing wrong in the killing of 12-year-old Tamir Rice.

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